we eat our own 9781501128318No script, no money, and soon no escape pretty much sums up the plight of the actors film­ing “Jun­gle Blood­bath” in Kea Wilson’s tightly plot­ted and beau­ti­fully writ­ten “We Eat Our Own”. Eccen­tric and pos­si­bly insane direc­tor Ugo Vel­luto lures des­per­ate wannabe actor Adrian White (whose real name we don’t learn until the end of the book) to be his unlucky and unlikely lead­ing man after the first actor to be cast in the part flees in ter­ror. To pre­vent this hap­pen­ing again, once White shows up, Ugo has his pass­port con­fis­cated and informs him there is no script.

The naive and increas­ingly des­per­ate White finds him­self immersed in a hotbed of inter­na­tional drug deal­ers, M-​19 gueril­las, and can­ni­bal­ism scenes that may or may not be entirely sim­u­lated. It doesn’t take long for him to real­ize he’s in way over his head and that his suc­cess as an actor isn’t up for debate so much as his survival.

Wil­son is being com­pared to Cor­mac McCarthy and with good rea­son; her prose is taut, her action thrilling, and her char­ac­ters veer toward extremes – guilt-​ridden kid­napers, ruth­less Loli­tas, a direc­tor who thinks set­ting the jun­gle on fire is a great way to get action footage of extras flee­ing the flames. Movie buffs will find the story espe­cially com­pelling since Wil­son loosely bases it on the con­tro­ver­sial 1970’s Ital­ian hor­ror film “Can­ni­bal Holocaust”.

If all this sounds a bit over the top, make no mis­take – “We Eat Our Own” is an expertly paced, riv­et­ting novel with char­ac­ters that may not be like­able, but are often unfor­get­table. Per­haps not everyone’s cup of tea – there’s graphic vio­lence, White’s char­ac­ter of ‘Richard’ is por­trayed entirely in the sec­ond per­son, and dia­logue is writ­ten with­out quo­ta­tion marks, so you have to pay atten­tion to know who is speak­ing. All of this may take some get­ting used to, but don’t be deterred. “We Eat Our Own” is a har­row­ing and mes­mer­iz­ing novel you won’t want to put down.

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